How Does The MeMA-Music Program Work

Collaboration

Our collaborative role supports teachers in delivering high-quality arts-integrated programs that provide equitable educational opportunities to increase student engagement, support social and emotional learning, and activate critical thinking and problem-solving skills. Our program is not meant to replace traditional curricula, but to supplement and enrich classroom lessons and allow students to make meaningful connections between subject areas. Residencies can be customized to adhere to the specific needs of individual schools.

Multidisciplinary

Our in-school arts-integrated residency program, “Voice Your Soul” is custom-designed to fit each school’s needs and align with Standards. We work together with teachers to establish clear instructional goals and outcomes. The  residency
consists of 24 one-hour sessions, typically meeting three days a week (or per school scheduling needs) plus a culminating event—a showcase of student-created social justice projects—presented en-masse in the school auditorium for classmates, teachers, and parents/caregivers/family members.

Resources

Our program includes customizable lessons with student-centered activities, and instructional resources: Appropriate music, videos, reliable news, educational social media, historical speeches, and more, project-based learning, rigorous integration of—ELA, Social Studies, Civics, SEL, Technology, Art, and Music, culminating social justice-themed projects featuring multimedia, art, and creative writing—songs, rap, poetry, skits—and live performances, Teaching Artists at the top of their profession from video production to hip-hop.

Program Framework

Phase 1
Theory & Analysis

Yoga takes you into the present moment. The only place where life exists.

In the first part of the unit, students increase their knowledge of how people have protested injustice in the past and present by analyzing texts—song lyrics, social media, news, and other mentor texts—to determine the intended message and meaning, and what makes the content uniquely powerful. Legendary songs and videos of the ’60s-’70s will be a mentor text for how music can be more than entertainment, but a platform for social commentary and change. Other forms of protest—marches, walkouts, and sit-ins—will provide students with a broader understanding of how you can peacefully communicate your message about injustice. Students will learn what makes a message powerful and consider how they can craft their own message of change.

Phase 2
Research & Projects

In the first part of the unit, students increase their knowledge of how people have protested injustice in the past and present by analyzing texts—song lyrics, social media, news, and other mentor texts—to determine the intended message and meaning, and what makes the content uniquely powerful. Legendary songs and videos of the ’60s-’70s will be a mentor text for how music can be more than entertainment, but a platform for social commentary and change. Other forms of protest—marches, walkouts, and sit-ins—will provide students with a broader understanding of how you can peacefully communicate your message about injustice. Students will learn what makes a message powerful and consider how they can craft their own message of change.

Yoga takes you into the present moment. The only place where life exists.

Let’s Work Together

Are you passionate about arts education, music, social-emotional learning, history, and social justice? Partner with us and enhance student academic learning, improve student engagement, and improve critical thinking and
problem-solving skills.

Contact Us